Thursday, 17 July 2008

felt and anvil

Proto-Indo-European *pel- "to thrust, strike, drive". The suffixed form *pel-de-, perhaps meaning "beat", became Proto-West-Germanic *feltaz "compressed wool", then Old English felt - felt was created by pressing animal and vegetable fibers together.

*pel-de- combined with Old English an (related to Modern English on) to form anfilte, anfealt "anvil" - that is, "something beaten on". The OED says this word was perhaps modeled on Latin incūs "anvil", from in plus cūdere "to beat".

3 comments :

Glen Gordon said...

I'm not sure where this morpheme *-de- comes from or how it's attested for the PIE level. Can you clarify?

goofy said...

Could it be *de- "demonstrative stem, base of prepositions and adverbs"? As in Latin dē- and English to?

Glen Gordon said...

If that were the case, why wouldn't this morpheme be preposed instead of postposed?